540 Acft

What is the ACFT?

The Acft, or Army Combat Fitness Test, is an aerobic fitness test that replaced the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) in 2020. The Acft is intended to better evaluate a soldier’s aerobic readiness for combat and is intended to be more demanding and all-encompassing than the APFT. The test comprises six activities: a three-repetition maximum deadlift, standing power throw, hand-release push-ups, sprint-drag-carry, leg tuck, and a two-mile run. Each activity is intended to evaluate various facets of physical fitness, including strength, power, endurance, and agility. The Acft is rated on a point system, and soldiers must obtain a minimum score to pass. The implementation of the Acft is part of the Army’s attempt to make sure that soldiers are aerobically prepared for the demands of combat and to enhance overall readiness.

The 6 ACFT Events

The 6 Acft events are crafted to test diverse aspects of physical fitness that are crucial for military readiness. They incorporate:

1. Powerlifting Deadlift – This event gauges lower body strength and is executed by hoisting a barbell from the ground to a standing position.

2. Standing Power Toss – This event gauges upper body power and involves throwing a 10-pound medicine ball as far as feasible.

3. Hand-Release Push-Ups – This event assesses upper body endurance and involves executing as many push-ups as feasible in two minutes, with the additional requirement of releasing the hands from the ground between each repetition.

4. Sprint-Drag-Carry – This event gauges speed, agility, and anaerobic endurance through a series of movements that involve sprinting, dragging a sled, carrying heavy objects, and backpedaling.

5. Leg Tuck – This event measures core and grip strength by necessitating the participant to hang from a bar and complete as many leg tucks as feasible in two minutes.

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6. 2-Mile Run – This event assesses aerobic endurance and is finished by running two miles as speedily as feasible.

Each event is evaluated based on the participant’s performance relative to a set standard, with the overall score representing an average of the six event scores. The Acft is designed to be a more comprehensive and pragmatic assessment of physical fitness than its predecessor, the Army Physical Fitness Test.

Preparing for the ACFT

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Preparing for the ACFT:

The Army Combat Fitness Test (Acft) is a new physical fitness test that all soldiers must pass to maintain their fitness readiness. If you’re getting ready for the Acft, there are a few things you can do to prepare yourself.

First, make sure you’re familiar with the six events that make up the Acft: the deadlift, standing power throw, hand-release push-up, sprint-drag-carry, leg tuck, and two-mile run. Each event tests different aspects of your physical fitness, so it’s important to focus on your weaknesses as well as your strengths.

Next, make sure you’re following a consistent workout routine that includes strength training and cardio. The Acft requires both upper and lower body strength, as well as endurance, so it’s important to train all aspects of your fitness.

Consider working with a personal trainer or fitness coach who can help you tailor your workouts to the specific requirements of the Acft. They can also help you track your progress and adjust your training as needed.

Finally, make sure you’re fueling your body with the right nutrients. Eating a balanced diet that includes plenty of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats can help you build and maintain the strength and endurance you need to pass the Acft.

With the right preparation and training, you can feel confident and ready to tackle the Acft and maintain your fitness readiness.

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Scoring and Standards on the ACFT

Scoring and Standards on the ACFT

The ACFT has six events that are scored and evaluated based on specific standards. The maximum score for each event is 100 points, and a minimum score of 60 points is necessary to pass the test. The six events are:

1. Deadlift: In this event, the soldier must lift a weight of about 140 pounds from the ground to the waist level. The maximum score for this event is around 25 points.

2. Standing Power Throw: In this event, the soldier throws a 10-pound medicine ball as far as possible over their head. The maximum score for this event is approximately 25 points.

3. Hand-Release Push-Up: In this event, the soldier must complete as many push-ups as possible in two minutes. The maximum score for this event is about 25 points.

4. Sprint-Drag-Carry: In this event, the soldier sprints 50 meters, drags a sled weighing 90 pounds for 50 meters, carries two 40-pound kettlebells for 50 meters, and then sprints another 50 meters. The maximum score for this event is roughly 25 points.

5. Leg Tuck: In this event, the soldier must complete as many leg tucks as possible in two minutes. The maximum score for this event is approximately 25 points.

6. Two-Mile Run: In this event, the soldier must complete a two-mile run as quickly as possible. The maximum score for this event is around 25 points.

To pass the ACFT, soldiers must score at least 60 points on each event. Additionally, soldiers must achieve a minimum cumulative score of 360 points across all six events. Soldiers who score between 360 and 600 points will receive a “moderate” fitness rating, while those who score above 600 points will receive a “high” fitness rating.

The ACFT is designed to be more challenging than the previous Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and to better measure a soldier’s overall fitness and readiness for combat. The standards and scoring on the ACFT are meant to reflect the physical demands of modern warfare and to ensure that soldiers are able to perform their duties effectively in any situation.

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The Future of the Army Combat Fitness Test

The Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) was implemented in October 2019, replacing the outdated Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). The ACFT is a more comprehensive and challenging test that better measures a soldier’s overall fitness and readiness for combat. However, the ACFT is still a relatively new test, and there is ongoing discussion about its future.

One potential change to the ACFT is the addition of a body composition component. Currently, the test only measures physical performance through six events: the three-repetition maximum deadlift, standing power throw, hand-release push-up, sprint-drag-carry, leg tuck, and two-mile run. However, some argue that a soldier’s body composition should also be considered as it impacts their overall health and readiness for combat.

Another possible change is the incorporation of different events based on a soldier’s military occupational specialty (MOS). The current ACFT is a one-size-fits-all test, but some argue that certain MOSs require specific physical abilities that are not tested in the current ACFT. For example, infantry soldiers may require more endurance and agility, while tank crew members may need more upper body strength.

Additionally, there is ongoing discussion about the scoring system for the ACFT. Currently, soldiers must achieve a minimum score in each event and an overall minimum score to pass the test. However, some argue that the scoring system should be adjusted to better reflect a soldier’s overall fitness level and readiness for combat.

Overall, the future of the ACFT is still being discussed and evaluated. As the Army continues to gather data and feedback on the test, alterations and adjustments may be made to ensure that it is an accurate and effective measure of a soldier’s overall fitness and readiness for combat.